According to research, as men age, they are more prone to experience symptoms such as erectile dysfunction and lack of sex drive due to low levels of testosterone.

The hormone testosterone helps maintain a number of essential bodily functions in men, like – sperm production, fat distribution, muscle strength/mass, red blood cell production, or bone density.

Furthermore, during puberty, this hormone supports to build a man’s muscles, boosts the size of his testes and penis, and deepens his voice.

Astaxanthin and testosterone

Astaxanthin is a naturally occurring carotenoid red-pink pigment which is found in yeast, microalgae, trout, salmon, shrimp, krill, crustaceans, crayfish, and the feathers of some birds.

This carotenoid may help to naturally modulate the activities and levels of estrogen, testosterone, and other hormones.

According to research, at a dose of 800mg, a combination of Saw Palmetto (an extract from the small type of palm tree found in Florida) and astaxanthin increases testosterone levels while decreasing dihydrotestosterone (DHT) via inhibiting the 5-alpha reductase enzyme.

High levels of dihydrotestosterone actually lead to decreasing testosterone production, since dihydrotestosterone converts back into androstenediol, a precursor to the hormone testosterone but with strong estrogenic properties.

Other health benefits of astaxanthin

Reduces Inflammation Levels

It is 550 times stronger than vitamin E, 6000 times more potent than vitamin C, and 800 times more powerful than CoQ10. Therefore, it might be useful as a treatment for problems which involve inflammation, like – carpal tunnel syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis.

Eye Health

According to studies, this antioxidant helps in cases of macular degeneration (ranks 3rd among the global causes of visual impairment with a blindness prevalence of 8,7 percent), diabetic retinopathy, seeing in fine detail, and eye fatigue and strain.

Lowers LDL Cholesterol Levels

LDL cholesterol is better known as the “bad” cholesterol because it contributes to fatty buildups in arteries. At doses of 6-8mg per day, this carotenoid can lower the oxidation of bad cholesterol and prevent it from becoming atherogenic.

Boosts Physical Energyphysical exercise

It provides a faster recovery from intense and moderate physical exercise. In addition, it lowers the storage and production of lactic acid which ultimately lowers recovery time and muscle soreness.

Breast Cancer

About 1 in 8  women in the United State (approximately 12 percent) will develop this type of cancer during their life. Breast cancer is the 2nd leading cause of cancer death in women, after lung cancer. A recent study shows long- and short-term benefits for the treatment of breast cancer of using a supplement with this antioxidant, including reduced growth of breast cancer cells.

Skin Protection

After ingestion, this carotenoid accumulates in the skin, where it makes its way into all skin layers (for instance, topical sunscreens can reach only the outermost layers). This can provide a strong protection against ultraviolet radiation. Another benefit of this antioxidant is represented by its capacity to improve skin moisture levels and to reduce wrinkles.

Atherosclerosis Prevention

Atherosclerosis, narrowing and hardening of the arteries, slowly and silently blocks arteries, putting blood flow at risk, hence, increasing the risk of heart diseases. Research has established that this antioxidant may slow atherosclerosis progression and prevent oxidative stress.

Dosage

Human clinical studies have used this carotenoid in a dose that ranges from 4 mg up to 100 mg/day with a one-year break.

The best method to take it as a supplement is in soft gel capsules which contain flax oil, plus vitamin E, that acts as a natural preservative to prevent flax oil from going rancid.

Other Methods To Boost Your Testosterone Naturally

Vitamin Dsunshine vitamin

Men with low vitamin D levels are much more inclined to have a low testosterone level when compared to men with adequate amounts of the sunshine vitamin.

Zinc

Zinc deficiency can obstruct a healthy testosterone production, therefore, in order to get high testosterone levels, it would be wise to have sufficient zinc in the daily diet and to avoid dietary reductions.

Ginger

Ginger can considerably improve semen and testosterone quality in infertile men, according to a 2012 study published in the Tikrit Medical Journal.

Strength Training

Strength training can induce testosterone and growth hormone release, according to the scientists at Ball State University.

Lose Extra-Weight

If you’re overweight, losing the excess pounds may increase your testosterone levels.

Get Enough Sleep

A lack of sleep affects numerous chemicals and hormones in your body, which may have a negative impact on your testosterone levels. Individuals who don’t get enough sleep are at higher risk for chronic disease as well as from reduced quality of life and cancer.

Lower Stress

When your physical body experiences stress, you release a hormone secreted by your adrenal glands (also known as suprarenal glands) called – cortisol, which lowers the effects of testosterone on your body. Many studies have shown that a daily meditation practice is an effective method to decrease your stress levels.

Avoid

  • Trans-fats – a diet high in trans-fatty-acids is linked with lowered testosterone levels and sperm counts in humans, according to research.
  • Alcohol – consuming alcoholic drinks (of any type) lowers testosterone levels. For example, the hops used to make beer contain 300,000 IUs of estrogen per 100g of hops.
  • Dairy products – milk contains prolactin, growth hormone, androgens, glucocorticoids, and the female sex hormones, estrogens.

Side Effects

Presently, there are no studies demonstrating any side effects of using supplements which contain astaxanthin.

However, if you’re taking prescription drugs for hypertension, you should know that this antioxidant might lower blood pressure. To stay on the safe side, always consult with your healthcare specialist before taking any type of supplement.

References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2544367/
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3083660/